By Kiyimba Bruno

Kiyimba.bruno@gmail.com

“Police must add more tactics in their training in order to deal with the rampant women murders in the country. It might be that the murderers get time to watch movies and this might be a source of their tricks which the police have not yet known.”

Those were some of the words spoken by the Makerere University Dean for the school of women and Gender studies Prof. Sarah N Ssali in her remarks during a one on one with her during Gender Identity Week at the university.

Ssali said that she is so sad with the unending murder of women which vice has not been stopped by the responsible security organs.

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“Police should dig deep into this issue because they must protect us” Noted Ssali.

She went ahead to highlight that gender based violence in women is something that needs to be looked at seriously by government.

On this note Ssali advised government to ask itself a question why women are the only ones involved in these murders.

According to her, Ssali believes women are weaker than men, there is too much drug abuse and many more might be some of the reasons why women are mostly involved in the current murders.

In the same Gender week, today’s concentration was basically on men as role models in the Gender issues since they are key players towards a girl child’s safety.

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It is from here that Ssali noted out some key challenges that they are facing as women towards running away from the gender based violence.

She said culture is still one big hindrance that women are facing in their fight to run away from the gender based violence.

Ms Ssali noted that many women are still lagging behind with cultural norms yet their male counterparts are moving at a very fast rate.

Sponsored by Sida, the Gender identity week is aimed at celebrating the women’s day in a holistic manner featuring academics, gender activists, development partners, media and students who interact with the general public.

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