By Watchdog reporter

Dr Ian Clarke, the proprietor of the upscale International Hospital Kampala, has also joined the education business.

The Irish-Ugandan doctor’s school was opened officially by Ms. Jennifer S Musisi, Executive Director at Kampala Capital City Authority – KCCA last week.

The school, named after Clarke, is located in Bukasa, a suburb of Kampala, not far from IHK and its founder says it will train future leaders for Uganda.

Clarke, the former mayor of Makindye Division and failed MP aspirant, has never shied away from showing his disapproval for many a Ugandan leader, and the mediocre Ugandan society.

Clarke envisions his schools to raise leaders that could put an end to the mediocrity in the Ugandan society which seems to be bred in the prevailing education system.

It is understood that the education sector is however a more lucrative sector, and for Clarke to target middle class parents, leaves the children of the poor but with leadership skills, in the cold.

Clarke is known for having acumen for business targeting the middle and upper-class tier, however, his argument about Clarke Junior School providing an alternative to the Ugandan educational system which is exam based, should be applauded.

In a message on his facebook page, Dr Ian Clarke, said, “Clarke Junior School was founded to bring a different approach to Ugandan education. The motto ‘Inquire, discover, learn’, encapsulates our student centred approach.”

Below is Ian Clarke’s full message about his new venture:

Clarke family at the new school

The Clarke family first came to Uganda almost 30 years ago and have been actively involved in the health sector ever since, but with 50% of the Ugandan population under the age of 15 years, the education sector is also of critical importance. Clarke Junior School was founded to bring a different approach to Ugandan education. The motto ‘Inquire, discover, learn’, encapsulates our student centred approach. The school is aimed at Ugandan middle class families, whose children will be the leaders of tomorrow. Much of the Ugandan system is knowledge and exam based, and while we believe that understanding of the fundamentals of subjects such as Maths and English is important, it is even more important to create critical thinkers and lifelong learners who are equipped for the rapidly changing world of the 21st century.

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